GOTR-Nebraska 5K Info

Regional GOTR-Nebraska 5Ks

GOTR-Nebraska serves girls across a 450-mile span. Participants are encouraged to register for one of the season-ending GOTR 5Ks in their area. In 2014, GOTR-Nebraska participants joined events in Chadron in the Panhandle, O’Neill in the North-Central region and in Lincoln for the Nebraska metro area. Check back here each season to register for the GOTR-related 5K in your area.

Run Buddies Required

Every GOTR girl on the course must be accompanied by a registered Run Buddy to encourage her every step of the way. The Run Buddy is a key source of support and safety for a GOTR girl. A Run Buddy is designated by the parents to run with and encourage their GOTR girl from start to finish on the 5K trail. It can be a parent, family friend or sibling (minimum age 18), a teacher at her school – anyone you think will be a positive-minded 5K partner on the course with her. Run Buddies may accompany up to two girls on the course.

Being a Run Buddy at the GOTR 5K is a fun and gratifying experience. A Run Buddy helps ensure a GOTR girl’s safety at this large event and motivates her to do her very best. Sharing the 5K experience with a GOTR girl is an uplifting and unforgettable experience for both participants. It’s a great opportunity for a GOTR girl and her parent, mentor or friend to bond.

Online registration for regional GOTR-Nebraska 5Ks is on the 5K Options page. Sign up early to get the lowest registration fees and guarantee a GOTR 5K T-shirt.

What to Expect at a GOTR 5K

There will be a HUGE crowd. The GOTR 5K is large –  some GOTR-Nebraska events host more than 2,000 participants on the course and thousands of spectators and volunteers. Follow the directions outlined in the Event Guide for parking, arrival, check-in, and so on.

Enjoy the atmosphere. Unlike many 5Ks, where you just show up and run, the GOTR 5K is a party celebrating the hard work of all the girls. Pre-race time is for signing shirts, getting crazy hair-dos at the Goody Happy Hair Station, getting tattoos, warming up with their teams and having fun. This is part of the excitement and you don’t want to cut this activity time short. And don’t forget your camera!

Pace yourself on the course. As part of that excitement, it’s tempting for GOTR girls to run faster than they can maintain to keep up with other runners. Resist this temptation. Run your own race, and maintain the pace at which you have trained. It’s OK to run faster later on in the race, but your experience will be much more pleasant and you’ll get to the finish faster if you’ll move slowly at first.

Hydrate. There will be water near the 1.5-mile mark and at the finish line. If you think you’ll need additional water, consider carrying a small water bottle with you. 

Volunteers are there to help. Don’t worry if you’re behind the lead runners by a considerable distance. You will not get lost. Volunteers are placed at critical places to give directions and keep you on course. Keep moving at your own pace. 

If You’ve Never Been to a 5K Before …

Never joined or attended a community 5K ? Read on to learn about procedures and behavior.

5K Etiquette for First-Timers

1. Like any road race, it will be crowded at the start. It takes a while for the crowd to thin out. Be patient and move forward as best you can. It may take you several minutes before you reach the official “starting line” and that’s ok.

2. When the race starts move at your own pace in as much of a straight line as the traffic permits. This will allow anyone behind you to pass you without wondering where you’re going.

3. Do not push or shove runners out of your way.

4. Be aware of other runners.

5. Try to stay out of the way of faster runners.

6. Just like driving, stay to the right and pass on the left.

7. Enjoy the experience and don’t be afraid to interact with other runners.

8. As you pass the water station, grab some water from the table or the outstretched hand of a volunteer and keep moving. If you intend to stop to drink your water, go ahead, but move to the side of the trail. Try to toss the cup to the side of the race route so runners behind you don’t have to run through an obstacle course of crushed cups.

9. As you approach the finish line, some runners will kick it up a notch. Be aware of runners coming up behind you as you approach the finish chute. While it’s not acceptable to push someone out of the way, passing up until the last moment is allowed and even expected.

10. At the finish line, there will be food and water provided. Please move through the line then find a place out of the way of the finish area to clear the area for the runners coming behind you.

11. Find a place to cheer on the remaining runners.

12. As often as you can, look each volunteer in the eye (water stop volunteers, traffic monitors, course monitors, etc.) and say thank you! Remember that the event would not be possible without them! Also acknowledge police officers who are directing traffic as well as they’re working to keep you safe.